Tips Posts

What’s Old is New – Getting Rid of Rust

A majority of percussion equipment contains some type of metal that is prone to developing rust after years of wear and tear.  This could be an old snare drum with rusted out lugs, rusty rims and rust on the shell, or an old set of bells that has lost its shine. Don’t let the rust stand in the way of an instrument being used properly and sounding great.  With a little bit of time and some elbow grease you can make those OLD instruments look and sound NEW again.

You can quickly and effectively remove rust on your percussion equipment by following a few steps:

Step 1: Remove parts from the instrument so that all areas can be exposed to cleaning.  Do not try to clean or remove rust with parts still attached the instrument.  For instance, remove all lugs from the drum so they can be cleaned individually and all the way around.

Proper Nutrition and Hydration is a Must for Marching Band

nutirtionWhen it comes to marching band, we tend to spend a lot of time thinking only about the notes being played or the steps being taken. There isn’t always enough thought placed on how to keep performers well-nourished and hydrated for maximum performance. Marching band, like any other sport, counts on members to be healthy in order to be successful. Make sure you (the director, parent, and student) are doing your part to keep yourself and everyone else on the field!

Here is an article from July 11, 2014 that was found at halftimemag.com. You’ll find that many of today’s top drum corps and marching bands put a lot of emphasis on proper nutrition and hydration. If you’re in marching band, you are an athlete; it’s time to treat your body as such! http://www.halftimemag.com/features/fueling-your-body.html

Percussion Equipment Evaluations and On-Site Repairs

Summer break is right around the corner and there’s no better time to get your instruments evaluated than now! Chops Percussion and Paige’s Music’s repair department are willing to send a trained specialist to your school to assess your percussion inventory.

Dustin Smith, our percussion repair specialist and sales associate for Chops, will work with you in deciding the best course of action to get your inventory back in its best shape! Paige’s Music offers on-site repair for large percussion instruments such as timpani, mallet instruments, concert bass drums, etc. This service is intended to alleviate the need to send in large instruments with your District Manager and be without them for several weeks. If an instrument is not repairable, Dustin will recommend the best replacement options to best suit your ensemble’s needs.

No more waiting for your large instruments or going without because the instrument is waiting in the shop! Small percussion instruments can be paired with a large percussion instrument request for added value. If interested in an equipment evaluation or on-site repairs, please email Dustin at dsmith@chopspercussion.com for more information.

Director And Instructor Job List

 

This time of year we like to remind everyone that Paige’s Music keeps a list of the current job opportunities for both directors and instructors.  This is a repost of an article we wrote last May.

It’s that time of year, when director and instructor positions begin to open up around the state.  If you’re looking for a certified teaching position, a percussion director position, or part-time tech work, make sure to check the Paige’s Music  job openings page.

If you’re a director looking for extra help, please make sure to post the opening here so we can help send candidates your way!  It’s easy to do.  Head over to the Paige’s Music home page.  Hover over “JOB LIST” in the top menu and click on “Job Post Request”.  Fill in the form and click submit.  We typically have your opening posted no later than the next business day.

You can also access that form directly by clicking here.

Please let us know if you have any questions about the job list.

Tips for Indoor Drumline – Warming Up Outside

This weekend is the only IPA show of the season that requires an outside warmup.  Those groups who have performed in Dayton for WGI Championships or participate in circuits in warmer regions of the country know this is a normal process.  The outside extended warmup can be very beneficial to preparing for the large arena environment.  But for those who have not gone through that process before, here are some tips to make sure the experience is smooth and beneficial for everyone.